Let's get the bad news out of the way first: unfortunately, there's no way to shrink specific parts of the body, which means you can't simply target belly fat. But that doesn't mean you can't work toward a trimmer waist. You just can't rely on crunches, planks, or sit-ups. Instead, it's all about putting yourself in a healthy calorie deficit, forming good habits, and doing full-body workouts that help you burn maximum calories. Here are some reliable tips to help you reach your goals.
There are different types of HIIT but an easy one to begin with is to simply warm up for 3 minutes on an elliptical machine or by walking.  Then work out for 30 seconds so that at the end of the exercise you feel satisfied.  Reduce the speed to slow down to a moderate pace.  Do this 7 more times or for total 8 intervals. Start with one interval and as your body is ready to take more increase the intervals.  Studies show that HIIT to be the absolute premier cardio for weight loss and optimal health as compared to longer, traditional cardio.

People with chronically high levels of the stress hormone cortisol tend to carry excess visceral fat. Foods that are high on the glycemic index (GI), which uses a ranking system of 0 to 100, cause more rapid spikes in your blood sugar, in turn triggering the release of cortisol when glucose levels crash. The constant up and down of your blood sugar levels can also lead to insulin resistance — the first step on the road to type 2 diabetes. To help keep cortisol levels stable, choose low-GI foods (with a rating of 55 or less) like beans, lentils, and chickpeas, instead of high-GI options like white rice and potatoes. To find the GI rating of your foods, use the University of Sydney’s database at glycemicindex.com.
The traditional hot-dog topping can do serious wonders for your waistline. "Fermented foods like sauerkraut, pickled veggies, and kimchi are some of the best sources of probiotics — a form of good bacteria that support healthy digestion and decrease bloat," says Frank Lipman, M.D., founder of Eleven Eleven Wellness Center in New York City. "That's important, since diets low in probiotics can cause bad bacteria to overtake the good ones, leading to health problems ranging from autoimmune diseases to weight gain."

"Your body needs a healthy balance of exercise and rest. Doing too much prevents the body from shifting excess fat. Exercising without rest can impact our levels of the steroid hormone cortisol and cause an increase of stubborn fat stored in the belly. Not allowing your body to recover can increase the risk of injury too, so make sure you factor in rest days to your plan."

"America has been trying to follow a low-calorie, low-fat diet for 40 years, and where has that gotten us? To being one of the heaviest countries in the world," says David Ludwig, M.D., Ph.D., obesity expert and author of Always Hungry. Think about it: "The problem is when you cut back on calories like that, your body tries to fight back with increased hunger and a slower metabolism because it thinks it's going into starvation mode," he says. Meanwhile, you eventually eat again to satiate the hunger pangs, and likely eat more because, well, you're insanely hungry. But your metabolism is still operating on that low level, so calories don't get burned fast enough and they get stored as fat. Ludwig says this cycle continues until you feed your body regularly (he suggests at least three meals and two snacks in between) with real food made from real ingredients. That matters more than the calories it's made up of, so repeat after us: I will always choose an all-natural version of something over food that's labeled low-calorie or fat-free.
Having good posture doesn't just make you look more confident — it's also a great way to flatten your tummy. Whether you're sitting at your desk at work or taking your dog on a walk, Harvard Medical School says good posture trims your figure, building up your core almost effortlessly and helping you get rid of belly fat as you go about your daily routine.
Visceral fat—a type of fat that lies deep inside your abdomen and surrounds your internal organs—is linked to a whole slew of terrifying health problems like heart disease and type 2 diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. Even scarier: According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), your risk of those health issues increases even more if your waist size is greater than 35 inches for women and 40 inches for men.
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